Small circular single stranded DNA viral genomes in unexplained cases of human encephalitis, diarrhea, and in untreated sewage

Kamruddin Ahmed, and Tung , Gia Phan and Daisuke Mori , and Xutao , Deng and Shaman Rajindrajith , and Udaya Ranawaka , and Fei , Terry Fan Ng and Filemon Bucardo-Rivera , and Patricia Orlandi , and Eric Delwart , (2015) Small circular single stranded DNA viral genomes in unexplained cases of human encephalitis, diarrhea, and in untreated sewage. Virology, 482 . pp. 98-104. ISSN 0042-6822

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2015.03.011

Abstract

Viruses with small circular ssDNA genomes encoding a replication initiator protein can infect a wide range of eukaryotic organisms ranging from mammals to fungi. The genomes of two such viruses, a cyclovirus (CyCV-SL) and gemycircularvirus (GemyCV-SL) were detected by deep sequencing of the cerebrospinal fluids of Sri Lankan patients with unexplained encephalitis. One and three out of 201 CSF samples (1.5%) from unexplained encephalitis patients tested by PCR were CyCV-SL and GemyCV-SL DNA positive respectively. Nucleotide similarity searches of pre-existing metagenomics datasets revealed closely related genomes in feces from unexplained cases of diarrhea from Nicaragua and Brazil and in untreated sewage from Nepal. Whether the tropism of the cyclovirus and gemycircularvirus reported here include humans or other cellular sources in or on the human body remains to be determined.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:Cyclovirus; Gemycircularvirus; Encephalitis; Diarrhea; CRESS-DNA
Subjects:Q Science > QR Microbiology
Divisions:FACULTY > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
ID Code:14852
Deposited By:IR Admin
Deposited On:02 Nov 2016 09:49
Last Modified:02 Nov 2016 09:49

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