Relationships between psychopathology, psychological process variables, and sociodemographic variables and comparison of quarantined and non-quarantined groups of Malaysian university students in the COVID-19 pandemic

Nicholas Tze Ping Pang and Sandi James and Nelbon Giloi and Syed Sharizman Syed Abdul Rahim and Azizan Omar and Mohammad Saffree Jeffree and Firdaus Hayati and Mei, Ching Lim and Mohd Amiruddin Mohd Kassim and Jun, Rong Ng (2021) Relationships between psychopathology, psychological process variables, and sociodemographic variables and comparison of quarantined and non-quarantined groups of Malaysian university students in the COVID-19 pandemic. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18 (9656). pp. 1-17. ISSN 1660-4601

[img] Text
Relationships between psychopathology.pdf

Download (45kB)
[img] Text
Relationships between psychopathology1.pdf
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (391kB)

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has had considerable psychological health impacts across the globe. This study aimed to establish the psychological process variables underlying psychopathology in Malaysian public university students during the national Movement Control Order (MCO). The aim was to craft structured and sustainable psychological support programs with these students. We conducted a cross-sectional study involving Malaysian university students subjected to the Malaysian MCO. Structured questionnaires measuring sociodemographic factors, measures of depression, anxiety, stress, psychological mindedness, psychological flexibility and state mindfulness were employed. A total of 515 students participated in this study with 12 students (2.3%) being quarantined at the time. Many of them scored ‘moderate’ or above on the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) with 20.2%, 25.0% and 14.2%, respectively. Quarantined students had higher depressive symptoms, with female students scoring significantly higher for depression, anxiety, and stress. Multiple regressions suggested gender and quarantine status predicted depression scores. However, only gender significantly predicted anxiety and stress. Psychological flexibility and psychological mindedness (Insight subscale) are significantly correlated with depression, anxiety, and stress, with psychological mindedness predicting all three psychopathologies. This study demonstrates that gender, psychological flexibility, and psychological mindedness are key demographic and psychological factors impacting students. Targeting psychological flexibility and psychological mindedness may enable timely prevention and intervention programs for our students to support their mental and physical health as we move through, and out of, the pandemic.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Anxiety , COVID-19 , Depression , Psychological mindedness , Stress
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA1-1270 Public aspects of medicine > RA421-790.95 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive medicine > RA648.5-767 Epidemics. Epidemiology. Quarantine. Disinfection
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA1-1270 Public aspects of medicine > RA421-790.95 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive medicine > RA790-790.95 Mental health. Mental illness prevention
Divisions: FACULTY > Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Depositing User: SITI AZIZAH BINTI IDRIS -
Date Deposited: 22 Dec 2021 18:13
Last Modified: 22 Dec 2021 18:13
URI: http://eprints.ums.edu.my/id/eprint/31535

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item