Effects of different water depths for aquaculture production of marble goby, Oxyeleotris marmoratus juvenile

Sanlin Ludin, (2010) Effects of different water depths for aquaculture production of marble goby, Oxyeleotris marmoratus juvenile. Universiti Malaysia Sabah. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Marble goby, Oxyeleotris marmoratus, a carnivorous fish native freshwater in Southeast Asia region, is a high valued species in many countries. This fish has high demand, However the production is low when compared to the others freshwater fish due to high mortality occurred at early juvenile stage 40 days after hatch (d AH).The study has been conducted to determine the effects of different water depths on juvenile rearing of O.marmoratus at 40 d AH when they start to become benthic fish. There were three different water depth (3.0 cm, 7.0 cm and 14.0 cm water depths) tested and each experiment was done in triplicate. Juvenile was fed with rotifer, Artemia salina and pellet during this study. Results shows that different water depths have no significant different (p > 0.05) effect on survival and growth rate of the juvenile in each treatment when analyzed with one-way ANOVA. The present study found that the survival and growth rate of the juvenile is no trend with respect to different water depth and suggested the lowest water depth, which is 3.0 cm water depths, is the best water depth for the juvenile rearing in term of economic evaluation.

Item Type:Academic Exercise
Uncontrolled Keywords:Marble goby, Oxyeleotris marmoratus, water depth, survival, growth, production
Subjects:S Agriculture > SH Aquaculture. Fisheries. Angling
Divisions:SCHOOL > School of Science and Technology
ID Code:11754
Deposited By:IR Admin
Deposited On:07 Oct 2015 11:56
Last Modified:07 Oct 2015 11:56

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